Limited Offer: Beverly Lowry’s Book, containing 206 pages, Titled “How We Raised A Hyperactive Child And Lived To Tell About It And YOU can Too!!!” and Mark Lowry’s first Music CD “He Touched Me” at the age of 9 in 1967

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$19.99

His first CD, recorded when he was 9 years old. He was singing church solos when he was 4 years old. His mother was a gifted musician.

 

For a limited time, you can purchase a hard copy of Beverly Lowry’s book, “How We Raised A Hyperactive Child and Lived to Tell About It and YOU can too!” and receive a bonus copy of a little Mark Lowry’s CD, “He Touched Me.” This bundle also includes a downloadable pdf copy of the “How We Raised A Hyperactive Child” book along with a downloadable pdf of Mrs. Lowry’s notes from her lectures on time management.

 

Also in the bundle is a copy of the Notes to a speech Beverly Lowry gave to a Christian Ladies Conference which contains 70 pages of her experiences as a Mother, Wife and College Professor at Liberty University teaching Child Psychology for 17 years.

 

Again, for $19.99, you receive the following bundle:

  • A hard copy of “How We Raised A Hyperactive Child”
  • A hard copy of child Mark Lowry’s CD “He Touched Me”
  • PDF download of “How We Raised A Hyperactive Child”
  • PDF download of Mrs. Lowry’s notes from her lectures on time management
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An excerpt from the book. This passage is written by Mark’s third grade teacher.

About: Mark Alan Lowry
By: Mrs. Ramona Hollan (1966-67)

This is a true story about a little nine-year-old American boy. In fact, this little boy is a Texan. Can you guess what city he lives in? Yes, right here in Houston, Texas. We’ll call this little boy Mark. I know this is a true story, because it happened right in my class at school, in third grade.

Mark was having quite a few problems in his classroom at school. He just couldn’t seem to get himself settled. His classmates hated him and didn’t want to sit by him or anything. I first learned of Mark when my principal told me that he was being moved to my room after the first six weeks of school this past year. She said that since Mark had gotten off to such a bad start and was so very unhappy and the class seemed to be progressing so much faster than he was that it might be better that he be moved to my room. She said, too, that since the other teacher was single and that since I was married and had a little boy of my own that I might be able to figure out Mark’s problem and help him.

It was on a Monday morning when I met Mark as the teacher next door brought him in and introduced him. He was a cute, clean-cut, neat little boy and I thought to myself, “Oh, we’re going to get along fine!” We have always been told and reminded each year over and over by our principal and superintendent that “There is good in each child and it is your job to search for the good and bring out the good and then the evil or bad will have a way of disappearing!”

Things went along fine for the first week or so. Then, gradually, as he began to get acquainted he began to do some of the things that he had done in the other room. He began to pick on the other children, call them ugly names, talk aloud, run around the room, and just hundreds of other things that were against our rules. He would not listen to directions and would not follow directions. He made comments on the work and said it was “easy.” The reason he thought it was so “easy” was that he was not taking his time and doing it correctly. As we walked down the hall he would swing around the poles, go the other directions (down the first grade hall, or fifth grade hall) and would just go the direction he wanted to go. On the playground, if he didn’t like the way the game was going, he would take the ball and run off to the far corner of the playground so he could have the ball to himself.

As time went on, Mrs. Hollan found an opportunity to chat with little Mark.

My first question was, “Mark, why do you act like you do?” He looked at me sort of funny as if he wasn’t going to answer and then said, “I don’t know what you’re talking about.” I said, “Oh, don’t give me that! You know exactly what I’m talking about.” You have been making bad, bad grades in conduct ever since you started to school. Why don’t you behave? Why don’t you be nice like other boys and girls? Why can’t you treat others the way they treat you? Why must you take away their valuable rights, especially the right to learn? Why do you steal?”

Mark’s eyes lit up—I was getting through. He said, “I don’t steal!” He was angry. I had to make him angry to get him to talking to get it through to him just what I meant. He said, “When did I ever steal anything, just tell me when it was and what it was! Mrs. Hollan, you know we go to church because my Mother told you. We go to church twice on Sunday and on Wednesday nights, too. I sing in the Junior choir. You know I’d never steal anything!”

I just sat there, letting him think over what I’d said. Then I said, “What about time? Every time you’ve talked and disturbed others you’ve stolen their time, their right to learn. When you say ugly words you steal someone’s clean thoughts by filling their mind with dirty thoughts. When you pinch or hit someone you’re taking away the right to keep a nice, clean healthy body—because you can make an ugly bruise or a broken part of the body. When you take the ball and run to the other side of the playground, you’re stealing someone else’s right to play with his classmates and have a good time. When you misbehave all the time and the teacher has to spend more time with you than with anyone else, you’re stealing the teacher’s time that each child in the classroom is entitled to.” I told him, “Right now, you’re stealing my time.” This also made him mad. “You don’t have to be here with me, you don’t have to be wasting your time like this!”

I told him that I knew that I didn’t have to spend my time doing this, but that I was because I wanted to do it. He asked me why I wanted to do it and I told him I was doing it because I loved him, and I wanted to see him grow up to be a fine young man. I told him if he continued in the same way he was going that he would end up in jail, or some place bad. The way he sassed his parents and talked back to and made fun of adults, he would continue doing the same as he got older and pretty soon do it to policemen and other officers and end up in jail.

He started crying, the first tears I’d seen all year except for the snake. Sure, he had gotten four or five spankings this year. He was smart enough to tell me later that “They only hurt for a while and then the hurt wears off.” With tears in his eyes, he started telling me his story.

When I was just a little boy, I realized that my brother (now age 11) could do many things that I could not do. I wanted to be just like him. He could climb trees, he could swim very fast, he could throwa ball and do all the things that boys like to do. I was always too little, too short, too slow! I guess to make up for it, I just go around pushing, shoving, and especially talking loud and ugly. This is the one thing that I can do and do well. This is the main thing that gets me in trouble. My brother has played on the Little League Baseball team. I never get to play on any team. I couldn’t even throw a ball, hit a ball, or jump a rope until I got in your room and you worked and worked with me and made me get out there and play. My other teachers just let me do what I wanted to do because I was “too much trouble” to bother with. You made me get out there and play. You worked and worked with me until I could jump a rope, then continued to work until I could hit that ball. I felt so proud.

The kids in the neighborhood will let me play with them now because I’m not afraid of the ball and can hit it and run like the rest of them. I’m also learning to take my turn. I guess I did all those ugly things because I had a yearning to be like my brother and couldn’t.

I then reminded Mark that God did not intend us to all be alike. Sure, I told him, our aim is to be like Christ. Prov. 20:11. He added, “No one is perfect.” I told him that I knew this, that it was always hard to keep from making mistakes and doing things that were not good, but you could constantly ask God to help you if you were a Christian. It was then that I asked him the question “Mark, are you a Christian?” “Living in the church house does not make you a Christian, just as a bird living in a hornets’ nest does not make him a hornet. Christ has to be living in your life. If you, with the help of Christ, do not change your bad habits, then it must be time to ask yourself, “Am I really a Christian?”

We talked a long time about many things the Lord had done and could do. I reminded him that his brother was talented in sports and that he was talented in other ways. He had a beautiful voice. I told him how proud of him I was when he sang those songs at P.T.A. But I also told him what the minister had said, too. He said, “I think it’s grand that a youngster like Mark has such a talent and the teachers and parents want him to use his talents.” He said he hoped Mark used his talent in the church (and he does by singing specials and sings in the choir) but he said, “You know, Mark may have a lovely voice and be a great musician, but he may be bad in another subject, such as math.” I told Mark how I felt, how I wanted to stand up and wave my hands and say, “Folks, let me tell you about Mark. It’s not his math that he is bad in—he is just bad, bad, bad. He needs to have Christ in his life so that he can control his life all day, every day, not just in church or when he’s singing for God or about God.”

I then reminded Mark that God did not intend us to all be alike. Sure, I told him, our aim is to be like Christ. Prov. 20:11. He added, “No one is perfect.” I told him that I knew this, that it was always hard to keep from making mistakes and doing things that were not good, but you could constantly ask God to help you if you were a Christian. It was then that I asked him the question “Mark, are you a Christian?” “Living in the church house does not make you a Christian, just as a bird living in a hornets’ nest does not make him a hornet. Christ has to be living in your life. If you, with the help of Christ, do not change your bad habits, then it must be time to ask yourself, “Am I really a Christian?”

Mark kept telling me, “But I want to be big like my brother because everyone likes him. He’s so nice and can do so many things.” Then I made the remark, “Well, you can’t, because you’re just a baby!” This made him mad, too. You see, I had worked with this child long enough to know that only when he got mad would he really listen to me and talk to me. At other times he would just close up and not say a word.

“I’m not a baby, I’m nine years old.” “Oh,” I said, “you’re not a baby—just how big are you? Are you big enough and strong enough to be the Mark that God wants you to be and not try anymore to be like your brother? God made you and he made you different. If God had intended you to be like your brother, don’t you think he’d have sent your mother and daddy twins, instead of waiting two years later to send you along?” (My message was getting through!) “God wants you to be YOU!” “He has made you different.”

“Yes,” he interrupted, “the pastor often says that the Bible says that ‘Wherefore come ye out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord.’ But,” he said, “I thought that meant that we were not to do the things that sinners and people of the world do.” I told him, “Yes, God intends us to be a separate people, a different people. Maybe that’s the reason your mother knew that I was a Christian. She could tell that I was different from the other people, yet at the same time, as we are all striving to be Christians and Christlike we have to each do it in our own way. We can’t all sing specials, we can’t all play the piano, but we can all do our best and be our best for Jesus no matter where we go.” I reminded Mark that his playmates could not tell that he was a Christian. He was the meanest little boy in the class, even in the whole school. Was that being Christlike? Pushing, shoving, stealing, using ugly language, talking back to his Mother and Father, his teachers, etc—to be a Christian one must strive to be like Christ. He must honour his Father and Mother (and those that teach him and take the place of Mother when she’s not there) and he must love his neighbors as well as his enemies.

Mark made a promise right then and there to me, and I asked him to make it to God also that he would start being the kind of Christian that God would want him to be—all the time! I told him that if he thought he was big and strong he’d have to prove it, because you have to be big and strong to get rid of the habits which you have had for a long time. I told him he’d have to start doing things for others—thinking of others, not just himself. Jesus went about doing good, helping the sick and the lame and raising them up. Jesus did not think of himself. He thought of others. He even gave His life for others—that we might live and have life more abundantly—like you, Mark, sang in your song.

Mark asked me if I was going to call his Father about our “conference under the tree” because he’d been so bad. I told him, “No, I’ll not call him. This promise is just between you, God, and me. If anyone does the telling, it will be you.” But, I reminded him that I expected to see just How BIG he really was the rest of the school year. I told him that since his Mother had been sick he could start by helping at home, doing things without being asked. He reminded me that often, even though his job was to get in the trashcans, his Father would have to do it because he “forgot to do his job”. That was the only job he had at home, but I reminded him also that there were many things a nine year old could do at home to help out. I reminded him, also, that his language must show that he is a Christian. The way he treated others should show that he loved them and that he has Christ in his life. The Bible tells us “Thou shalt not steal.” This means anything and time is certainly a thing!

His last words to me that day were, “Mrs. Hollan, I’m bigger than you think I am. I’m bigger than my brother in a few ways. I’ll prove to you for the rest of the year just how big I am.”

Things improved greatly. His life is changing, but it’s taking time, and, most important, it’s taking GOD in his life to make the change. Only God can change our life completely.

Later during the school year I saw Mark’s Mother and she said, “Mrs. Hollan, what in the world did you tell Mark?” I avoided her question (because I had promised him I would not tell) and I said, “Why?” Her remark was, “Well, the other day as we were riding to town he had several of his little friends in the back seat. I heard him tell them that his life was changed, that he was a different person.” She said that she had noticed a difference in Mark in the neighborhood and in his manner at home. Again she asked me, “Mrs. Hollan, what did you say to Mark?” I told her that we’d just had a little talk and that if she really wanted to know that she’d have to ask Mark. I had made a promise to him and I expected to keep it.” I don’t know if Mark ever told his Mother or not; that’s not real important. The important thing is that Mark’s life has changed—not because of me, not because he’s in church, but because God is IN Mark!

It’s important that you stay in church, yes! It’s more important that God stays in you! If God stays in your life then your life will shine and you’ll be the kind of Christian God wants you to be—when, where—7/ days a week, 24 hours a day, EVERYWHERE YOU GO!

Testimonials

Dear Bev,
My husband is a Minister. We have 2 grown daughters. We now have an adopted son who is 9 years old. He was recently diagnosed with ADHD. He is a big Mark Lowry fan. He goes to sleep at night listening to one of Mark’s CDs. He knows he can be anything he wants to be, even with ADHD, because Mark has. We appreciate so much Mark sharing his ADD with us.

It gives hope to children with learning problems. These special kids need that. I admire the wonderful job you and your husband did with your “special kid.” Mark is a God gifted young man. Our prayers are with all of your family as you serve our Lord. Thank you and Mark for sharing a difficult part of your life. It is a great help to know this is a “doable” task of raising special boys.

Love in Christ, Sherry

My 2 oldest sons (7 & 8 yrs) have ADHD (So far my 2 yr old is the “perfect brother”) and they absolutely adore Mark! They watch & scrutinize everything he does & says & I can see pieces of him in them because of that. And pieces of our Lord & Savior. Praise God for the light that shines thru him & you & your family. He has truly blessed our family & thru him you have as well. We are hoping to get to meet him when he comes to our city next month & someday I would love to meet you & thank you in person for the inspiration you are to myself & other mothers of ADHD kids. (And please, if you have any advice on how to deal w/them I’d love it!)

Thank you again & God Bless & Keep you. Donna

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